Stormwater Division

The permit requirements for Long-Term Stormwater Management in New Development and Redevelopment for Stormwater Minimum Control Measure 5 (MCM 5) are defined in Section 4.2.5-4.2.8.7.2 of the Jordan Valley Municipalities (MS4) Permit; No. UTS000001
The following is a summary of the requirements for MCM 5.
  1. Through an ordinance, or other regulatory mechanism, require long term stormwater controls on new development and redevelopment.
  2. Develop an enforcement strategy and implement enforcement procedures to obtain compliance for chronic and recalcitrant violators
  3. Develop a plan to retrofit existing developed public and private sites that are adversely impacting water quality.
  4. Develop design standards including LIDs that will minimize adverse stormwater affects of developed property.  Make this information available contractors, engineers, architects and planners.

Programs
5.1 Stormwater Ordinance (Land Development)
5.2 Riverton City Standards Specifications and Plans
5.3 Long-Term Stormwater Management Plan and Agreement
5.4 Stormwater System Covenant
5.5 Public Infrastructure Retrofit Plan
5.6 Private PRoperty Retrofit Plan
5.7 New Development LID Incentive
5.8 Existing Development LID Incentive
5.9 Stormwater Utility Fee Abatement



5.1: Stormwater Ordinances (Land Development)
Year Executed: 2010
Reference Regulation:
4.2.5.1, 4.2.5.2, 4.2.5.5.1
Target Pollutants:
Trash, debris, nutrients, pesticides & herbicides, bacteria & viruses, automotive petrochemicals, detergents, cleaning agents and sediment.    Other polluntants common with commerical, private communities, institutions and public infrastructure.
Audience:
Developers, Engineers, Architects, Planners and City Staff
Description:
The ordinances listed below are current and were adopted to facilitate the MS4 regulations for all 6 MCM’s.
Primary ordinances passed to satisfy MS4 regulation include:
13.20 Riverton City Stormwater Ordinance 
13.25 Riverton City Stormwater Utility Ordinance 
The following ordinances also support MS4 regulation but were passed independant of MS4 regulation include:
15 Buildings and Construction
17 Subdivision
18 Land Use and Development
Measure of Success:
Count the number of development applications where requirements were wavied that were directly a result of insufficient or absent development ordinance.   Make conclusions and recommendations to City Council.
5.1 Performance Information
Responsible Staff:
Stormwater Manager
Involved staff: Public Works Director, City Engineer, Engineering(Development), Planning Director
Funding:
Stormwater Utility, General Fund
Appendix:
SWMP Amendment (included ordinance amendments)
 


 5.2: Riverton City Standards Specifications and Plans
Year Executed: 2011
Reference Regulation:
4.2.4.3.3, 4.2.5.2, 4.2.5.2.1, 4.2.5.2.2, 4.2.5.3.2, 4.2.5.3.4, 4.2.5.4, 4.2.5.4.1, 4.2.5.4.2, 4.2.5.4.3, 4.2.5.5.2
Target Pollutants:
Trash, debris, nutrients, pesticides & herbicides, bacteria & viruses, automotive petrochemicals, detergents, cleaning agents and sediment. Other polluntants common with commerical, private communities, institutions and public infrastructure.
Audience:
Developers, Engineers, Architects, Planners and City Staff
Description:
The Standards Specifications and Plans referenced here are current and were initially developed to facilitate flood control but were modified to accomodate the MS4 regulations for all 6 MCM’s.  These standards are provided to the development applicants during the application process and is available at all times on the Riverton City Webpage.
Rational:
Standards Specifications and Plans specific to MS4 regulation is essential to facilitating the 6 MCMs. 
Measure of Success:
Annually evaluate the program issues related to design standards.  Make conclusions and recommendations to City.
Responsible Staff:
Stormwater, Utility Manager, Salt Lake County Public Works Department, Engineering Division
Funding:
Stormwater Utility
Standard Operations Procedures:
none
Program Documents:
2014-2018
No design standard issues were documented



5.3: Long-Term Stormwater Management Plan and Agreement
Year Executed: 2011
Reference Regulation:
4.2.1.3, 4.2.1.4, 4.2.4.3.1, 4.2.5.2.2, 4.2.5.3, 4.2.5.5, 4.2.5.5.1, 4.2.5.5.2, 4.2.5.5.3, 4.2.5.6, 4.2.5.7, 4.2.5.7.1, 4.2.5.7.2
Target Pollutants:
Trash, debris, nutrients, pesticides & herbicides, bacteria & viruses, automotive petrochemicals, detergents, cleaning agents and sediment. Other polluntants common with commerical, private communities, institutions and public infrastructure.
Audience:
Developers, Engineers, Architects, Planners and City Staff
Description:
New development and redevelopment is required to create a post construction plan the City calls Long-Term Stormwater Management Plan.  The program materials consist of Long-Term Stormwater Management Plan Template and an Agreement form.  The Agreement defines the developments legal responsibility to the City relative to MS4 regulations.  The Long-Term Stormwater Management Plan defines how the property owner must operator maintain the property with respect to protecting water quality. The Long-Term Stormwater Management Plan Template is based on 6 principles.
Inform the Operator’s, Operator’s personnel, subcontractors, Consultants and Agents of the post construction purpose and regulations.
Identify the developments unique pollutants and operations generating pollutants
Define the site infrastructure and its abilities and limitations at controlling and containing pollutants
Create standard operation procedures to compensate for limitations of the site infrastructure and its operations.
Facilitate Operator reporting
Facilitate Operator accountability
The program also satisfies 4.2.1.3, 4.2.1.4 as per the rational below.
Rational:
The intention is to ensure new development and redevelopment control and contain pollutants generated by their site’s operations and maintenance.  The approach is to encourage the owner to design LIDs into the site infrastructure to minimize or contain pollutants in order to reduce the level of standard operation procedures necessary to compensate for the LIDs limitations.  For example, if the site retains all runoff or the structural water quality device is designed to filter the pollutants it generates then the SOPs can requires less maintenance.  However, when the site infrastructure will not contain the pollutants then the SOP must be scaled up to compensate.  This encourages the Operator to design LIDs and effective permanent water quality devices in order to lessen the maintenance requirements.  However, it should not matter to the MS4 whether the Operator chooses effective LIDs and structural water quality devices or chooses to increase the controls in the SOPs so long as the Operator can demonstrate through inspection reports that the sites Long-Term Stormwater Management Plan is effective at controlling the pollutants.
Measure of Success:
Maintain a Long-Term Stormwater Management Plan inspection log and annually conclude or  summarize progress and effectiveness.
Responsible Staff:
Stormwater Manager
Funding:
Stormwater Utility
Program Documents:
Conclusion:
2017-2018
City has received over 60 Long-Term Stormwater Management Plan since 2011.  Staff believes the plans are necessary to help the operators understand their impact to the State’s water bodies. 



5.4: Stormwater System Covenant
Year Executed: 2016
Reference Regulation:
4.2.5.3, 4.2.5.5, 4.2.5.5.3, 4.2.5.7, 4.2.5.7.1, 4.2.5.7.2
Target Pollutants:
Trash, debris, nutrients, pesticides & herbicides, bacteria & viruses, automotive petrochemicals, detergents, cleaning agents and sediment. Other polluntants common with small private communities.
Audience:
Developers, Engineers, Architects, Planners and City Staff
Description:
The Stormwater System Covenant(CTM) document is intended to protect required small private stormwater infrastructure necessary for flood management and the water quality controls.   The CTM establishes responsibility to the infrastructure that must be maintained and protected in order to prevent flooding to the property and adjacent properties including City right of way from the increased runoff impacts and pollutants generated on the property that can affect surface waters and groundwater.  It defines the legal boundaries of the flood control and water quality infrastructure and any maintenance requirements to ensure adequate performance of the system.      
Rational:
The LTSWMP was not reasonable and practicable for small private developments that are not likely to have an active and functioning HOA.   The primary purpose is inform the property owners of flood control, any specific water quality componants and their responsibilities to the drainage system, however, the maintenance for the water quality is typically not included because these properties are categorized with the rest of the single family property owners who are covered by the City SWMP.   Generally these drainage systems are expected to be LID in nature having a intrinsic water quality benefit. 
Measure of Success:
Successfull long term preservation is the measure of success.  The water quality success will be measured by other programs.
Responsible Staff:
Stormwater Manager
Funding:
Stormwater Utility
Program Documents:
Conclusion:
2017-2018
The Covenant to Maintain is expected to be useful in the future.  Currently, it aids at ensuring the flood management and water quality control systems are complete and inspected prior to allowing occupancy of the property.  From past experience it has been a challenge to restore flood control infrastructure from being modified or destroyed by the property owner when the property owner was not informed of the flood control system and why it needed to be protected.  It is expected that the water quality infrastructure will also need this same level of education in order to protect it.  

 



5.5: Public Infrastructure Retrofit Plan
Year Executed: 2010
Reference Regulation:
4.2.5.3.3
Target Pollutants:
Trash, debris, nutrients, and sediment. 
Audience:
Riverton Public Works Department, and Engineering & Stormwater Division staff
Description:
City projects are required to follow Riverton City Stormwater Design Standards and Regulations as do private development.  Redevelopment is required to bring the proposed new infrastructure up to standards.
Rational: 
A program necessary retrofit existing public infrastructure and private infrastructure that are adversely impacting water quality is required by the MS4 regulation.  This requirement will likely change when Jordan River TMDLs are determined.
Measure of Success:
Acknowledge successful and failed retrofit projects
Responsible Staff:
Stormwater Manager, Public Works Director
Funding:
General fund, Stormwater Utility
Standard Operations Procedures:
Stormwater Design Standards and Regulations
Capital Facility Plan:
Capital Facility Plan(CFP) includes Impact and infrastructure deficiency based capital projects.  The water quality related deficiency are marked by the CFPdescription. 
Capital Facility Plan
Appendix I:
Retrofit Log
Conclusion:
2014-2015
The program is functioning.  Filter bags were installed at the Public Work Yard, Parks Yard and Cemetery Facility.  Documentation for past years success and failures is currenlty incomplete.

 


5.6: New Development LID Incentive
Year Executed: 2011
Reference Regulation:
4.2.5.3.2
Target Pollutants:
Trash, debris, nutrients, pesticides & herbicides, bacteria & viruses, automotive petrochemicals, detergents, cleaning agents and sediment.
Audience:
Developers, Engineers, Architects, Planners and City Staff
Description:
Riverton City offers a Stormwater Utility Fee discount to development who reduce polluted discharges and runoff volumes. 
Rational: 
The program encourages operators to incorporate LID in excess of the City minimums.  Reducing runoff will trap more pollutants than would normally runoff and increase infiltration and evaporation improving water quality to rivers, streams, creeks and canals.
Measure of Success:
Maintain a inventory of qualifying properties and make performance conclusions regarding the Operators LTSWMP inspection reports. 
Responsible Staff:
Public Works Director, Stormwater Utility Manager
Funding:
Stormwater Utility
Program Documents:
Conclusion:
2011-2018
Two new development Operators have implemented LIDs that warrant a fee reduction but the majority of development have chosen not to take advantage of the program.  



5.7: Exising Development LID Incentive
Year Executed: 2011
Reference Regulation:
4.2.5.3.2
Target Pollutants:
Trash, debris, nutrients, pesticides & herbicides, bacteria & viruses, automotive petrochemicals, detergents, cleaning agents and sediment.
Audience:
Commercial, HOA's, Institutional and Industrial Property Owners
Description:
Application process for an Operator to apply for a fee reduction by implementing implement LID infrastructure.
Rational: 
The program provides financial incentive encouraging operators to incorporate LID over and above the minimums.  LID generally reduces runoff trapping more pollutants than would normally runoff and increase infiltration and evaporation.
Measure of Success:
Maintain a inventory of qualifying properties and make performance conclusions regarding the Operators LTSWMP inspection reports.
Responsible Staff:
Public Works Director, Stormwater Manager
Funding:
Stormwater Utility
Program Documents:
Conclusion:
2011-2018
Three existing Operators have applied for a fee reduction but neither have met the requirements.  A handful of Operators have applied for corrections and received fee corrections.



 5.8: Stormwater Utility Fee Abatement
Year Executed: 2011
Reference Regulation:
none
Audience:
Riverton single family home residents
Description:
Application and process for the reduction or elimination of the Stormwater Utility Fee.
Rational: 
Residential owners are allowed to apply for an Stormwater Utility Fee abatement when hardship can be demonstrated.
Measure of Success:
NA
Responsible Staff:
Public Works Director, Stormwater Manager
Funding:
Stormwater Utility
Conclusion:
2011-2018
No residents have applied for a stormwater fee abatement.